Alberto Iglesias

Exodus: Gods and Kings [Original Motion Picture Soundtrack]

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Track Listing

    Track Title

    Time

  1. Opening - War Room 2:38
  2. Leaving Memphis 2:03
  3. Hittite Battle 4:15
  4. Returning to Memphis 2:36
  5. Moses in Pythom 1:49
  6. Nun's Story 2:17
  7. The Coronation 2:28
  8. Ramses Retaliates :52
  9. Arm Chop 1:57
  10. Goodbyes 2:41
  11. Journey to the Village 2:14
  12. The Vows 2:23
  13. Alone in the Desert 1:35
  14. Climbing Mount Sinai 2:16
  15. I Need a General 3:21
  16. Exodus 2:52
  17. Ramses' Orders 2:43
  18. Moses & Nun 1:47
  19. Moses' Camp 2:42
  20. Ramses' Insomnia 2:58
  21. Hail 2:00
  22. Animal Deaths 2:39
  23. Looting 1:18
  24. Ramses' Own Plague 2:04
  25. Lamb's Blood 1:39
  26. We Cross the Mountains 2:50
  27. Into the Water 3:59
  28. The Chariots 1:51
  29. The Hebrews :57
  30. Tsunami 5:33
  31. Sword into Water 1:12
  32. The Ten Commandments 3:37

Review

The tale of Moses leading the Hebrews from the deadly plagues of Egypt does not call for a light touch. Acclaimed Spanish composer Alberto Iglesias (Talk to Her, The Constant Gardener, The Kite Runner) might have been a slightly unexpected choice to score Ridley Scott's biblical epic Exodus: Gods and Kings, but, like Moses, he rises to the challenge with passion and drama. Though it lives up to contemporary standards, there is something refreshingly old-fashioned about Iglesias' big, theatrical score. With its massive choirs, heroic themes, and orchestral bombast, there is something of the golden age studio epic about it that is thrilling and fun. He employs a diverse mix of exotic voices and frequently uses an evocative Middle Eastern flair to tell a story that is high on action and adventure. Iglesias has always brought a classy romanticism to his work (particularly his scores for Pedro Almodóvar's films) and it's highly entertaining to hear him pull out all the stops and work in such a grandiose style. ~ Timothy Monger, Rovi